Forest From A Tree

Works by Ethan Sawyer

ffromat@gmail.com

Pieces I contributed to the show I organized on 3/21/14 called “Left In.” Six artists (Warren Veale, Kate Farmer, Lauren Hodges, Brigman Farmer, Wes Hardin, and Ethan Sawyer) from southeast Alabama contributed work, and an enjoyable time was had by everyone that attended.

Had the pleasure of installing a piece from my show Over the AM (Kentuck Center for the Arts) at a residence in Tuscaloosa today. 

Each panel consists of four slices of a 100yr old 4x6 pine post, rearranged to appear as though it is a cross section.

Installing “Ball of Yarn Armoire” at Kentuck Art Center, Northport, AL.  As you might can tell, it was snowing.  My show Over the AM coincided with the ribbon cutting for the new T.E.M.P. Gallery in the Georgine Clark Building at Kentuck.  

Installing “Ball of Yarn Armoire” at Kentuck Art Center, Northport, AL.  As you might can tell, it was snowing.  My show Over the AM coincided with the ribbon cutting for the new T.E.M.P. Gallery in the Georgine Clark Building at Kentuck.  

Gibbous this day. Over the AM. Kentuck Arts Center T.E.M.P. Gallery.

Over the AM. Kentuck Arts Center, February 2014.

Over the AM. Kentuck Arts Center, February 2014.

Portrait of office work, 2003.

Portrait of office work, 2003.

I’m very, very excited about this opportunity. “Over the A.M.” opens January 28, 2014, at the T.E.M.P. Gallery at the Kentuck Arts Center in Northport, Alabama. Reception February 6, 2014.

I’m very, very excited about this opportunity. “Over the A.M.” opens January 28, 2014, at the T.E.M.P. Gallery at the Kentuck Arts Center in Northport, Alabama. Reception February 6, 2014.

Edo meets Alabama credenza. Inspired by equal parts Japanese Edo period furniture and small town Alabama community college scrap bin contents, this 5 foot long by 2 foot deep storage piece features four doors along the front and a full length shelf inside. This piece resides somewhere in Atlanta GA these days.

Edo meets Alabama credenza. Inspired by equal parts Japanese Edo period furniture and small town Alabama community college scrap bin contents, this 5 foot long by 2 foot deep storage piece features four doors along the front and a full length shelf inside. This piece resides somewhere in Atlanta GA these days.

Another piece from the Steel Quilts series. 2 feet by 4 feet. Drawn by hand and plasma cut by hand, no CNC here.

Another piece from the Steel Quilts series. 2 feet by 4 feet. Drawn by hand and plasma cut by hand, no CNC here.

This commission had a very interesting story (as do many of them).  Years ago, my sister and brother in law lived in a historic neighborhood in Montgomery, AL.  Their next door neighbors were a very jolly older couple. Ten years went by, and I got an email from the old couple’s daughter, who now lives in the house.  She told me that over the years, her father had salvaged old panel doors and old wood with the intention of building something with it. Unfortunately, he passed away and that day never came for him, but the daughter wanted to me to use the old material to build her a new breakfast table.  Recycling coupled with history.

Oak, pine, fir. 48”x48”